in

User-built Open-source Database Includes Books, Magazines, Ebooks, Fanzines, Journals and More

Photo by Jaredd Craig on Unsplash

Bookogs, a user-built open-source database of books and magazines and sister-site to Discogs, has reached 100,000 items cataloged by its community.  Discogs and Bookogs communities are one-of-a-kind, collector-friendly sites with a focus on data and history.

Launched in 2015, Bookogs goal is to do for books what Discogs has done for music releases; creating a comprehensive archive of as many physical books releases as possible and build a large network of book-lovers, collectors and experts. In 2017, Bookogs Marketplace was opened giving users a convenient marketplace for buying and selling books online.

“We’ve seen so much support from the Discogs Community. Thanks to our users cataloging over 100,000 books on Discogs’ sister site, Bookogs, the world can browse one of the most extensive resources for books online,” said Ron Rich, Senior Vice President of Marketing at Discogs.  “We’ve recently cross-referenced all the music books on Bookogs to the entire Discogs Database of more than 6.1 million artists. By connecting this data, Discogs continues to be the largest, most accurate place for music history on the planet.”

While there are many online databases focusing on novels, non-fiction works, poetry, and magazines, Bookogs is the only database focusing on physical releases of books and the various editions that are released over time and geographies.

By adding books and magazines to the database, Bookogs users are helping to solidify the history of literature and physical releases, and in turn creating an invaluable resource for generations of readers, book-lovers, and collectors to come.

Visit Bookogs to submit your collection today.

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading…

0

Comments

0 comments

Photo by Larm Rmah on Unsplash

Empowering Books On Trauma Recovery To Assist Your Healing

Photo by Element5 Digital on Unsplash

Seven-year-old Boy Becomes One of the UK’s Youngest Published Authors